ANGLE OF VISION

When I met Bernard, it was “building site to defer” of a real group. Yes, each day, it brought backimages of building sites: these shows of street turned towards the future which they build; theseextraordinary ballets men and machines, which one persists in dissimulating behind of thepalisades as if they were voluntarily discredited urban landscape. It is on these waste grounds inbecoming, that Bernard decides to pose the first stone of a more personal work by exerting his artof land-surveyor of the light. It is there, in the vibrating matter of a concrete veil, in the impetuousdetails of a frame-wood, or along the indifferent lines of a metal railing, that the artist tracks the mildlights and contrasts wrapped to deliver us the subtle framings suspended in time. Because morethan to describe us a place, the images of Bernard voluntarily lose us in space in order to bettergive us to see one moment. You know, this negligible piece of time when the light gives finally itschance to the photographer to play us of the turns. Neither turns of black magic, nor tricks of whitemagic, but of malignant illusions in black and white, whose diagram hiding place as much therequirement of the photographer for the light as his control of space. “Visual angles” thus recalls usthat the true subject of photography is well time; that a photograph is initially feeling the onemoment which was and which will not return any more. The one moment emotion when the lightcomposes fragile and right balance. This impression of astonishment which it is necessary to knowto capture when the chance offers it to us and that one should not miss. That falls well, you arethere. Good visit. 

  

Eric Santonnat